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Outlet

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Changing Outlets from Beige to White

Find out how to change your electrical outlets from beige to white, without doing electrical work (and without painting them)!

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DIY a Built-in Extension Outlet

I've received a couple of emails asking how we converted a wall outlet into an extension outlet for our TV room sofa table. This outlet, built into the face of the table, allows us to utilize the electrical outlet that is behind the couch - without having to move the couch out of the way. I managed to corral Tom long enough to have him show me what he did. I shouldn't have to mention this, but if you are not comfortable/knowledgeable about working around electricity and electrical outlets, do not attempt to install this yourself. Update: We recently upgraded to an outlet with built-in USB ports, and I asked Tom to switch to a grounded wire at that time. Instructions are the same - refer to additional step for attaching third (ground) wire below. For this reconstruction we used spare parts we had laying around, but I'll also intersperse the photos and instructions with what we did the first time. However, the steps are exactly the same. Parts you will need: Tools you will need: If you're installing this outlet onto the face of a board - like a table - the first thing you'll want to do is cut a hole in the table the same size as the electrical box. Tom used a rotary zip saw, but you could also use a jigsaw. When Tom installed the original outlets he used an airtight electrical box like this that had a frame around it. He was able to screw the frame directly to the underside of the table. An airtight box wasn't necessary but it was all the store had in stock. If your electrical box doesn't have a frame, you can install a piece of scrap wood to the underside of your surface, and attach the box to it. That's what I'm going to show you here. Fit the electrical box into place and hold the scrap wood against it, along the side of the box with the bracket. Drill pilot holes through your surface and into the scrap board. Make sure they are very, very close to the hole so that the face plate will cover them. Attach the screws so that your scrap board is held in place. Flip your table upside down and set it on a stable surface like a workbench, or even on the floor. It'll be much easier to attach the electrical box without having to crawl under the table. Using the holes in the electrical box bracket as a guide, attach screws on each side so that the box is securely fastened to your scrap board. As I mentioned, if you are using an airtight box with a frame, you'll just use short screws and attach the box directly to the underside of your surface. You don't want the screws poking through the topside, so measure carefully. I prefer the look of the airtight box but you have to work with what you can find. And from the top it won't look any different. Once your box is mounted to the board, you can work on attaching the wiring. Take your extension cord and cut off the outlet connector (the socket end). Our outlet is only used to plug in lamps, phones, computers, etc., so we bought a light-duty 2-pronged cord, but if you are using your outlet for more heavy-duty loads or in wet areas, you'll want a 3-pronged grounded cord. Take the cut end of the cord and split the two wire bundles apart. Using your sidecutters, a knife or wire strippers, carefully cut through the plastic sheath without cutting the wire inside and pull it off. You'll want to have about an inch of exposed wire. Do this on both wires. Twist each bundle of exposed wire tightly so that it isn't fanned out. If you are using a grounded wire, there will only be one sheath. When you strip it off you'll find three more wire sheaths, white, black, and green. The green one is the grounded wire. You'll need to strip off an inch of each coloured sheath to expose the copper wire. It should look something like this: source Feed the two wires through one of the openings in the underside of the electrical box. The tabs are made of plastic, so you should be able to push them in slightly, enough to get the wire through. Pull the wire up through the front of the box so that you have enough to work with. Your electrical outlet will come with 4 brass screws, 2 on each side. Tighten one on each side just to get it out of your way. Take one of your wires and twist the exposed end around one of the (untightened) screws on the outlet. Make sure that you twist the wire in the same direction as you will be tightening the screw (usually clockwise). Tighten the screw down. Repeat this on the other side of the outlet. If you are using an extension cord with a third ground wire, attach that wire (which you previously stripped as above) to either the green screw in the bottom of the electrical box, or to the green screw that's right on the electrical outlet. Either place works, as once the electrical outlet is attached to the box the circuit will be complete. Once your wires are attached, screw the outlet into the box through the holes at either end (the correct screws should be provided with your outlet). Attach your faceplate and you're done. When we put the outlets in the sofa table we used a larger rectangular outlet versus the common outlet with rounded corners. These outlets require a slightly larger faceplate - which is beneficial to you if you're using the scrap board mounting method and need to cover up your screw holes. Once Tom showed me how to install this outlet, I couldn't believe how easy it was. I'm terrified of electricity, but I think even I could do this without being afraid of zapping myself. I'm thinking of attaching one to the side of my craft table so that I don't have to crawl under the table all the time to plug things in - the sewing machine, the Silhouette cutting machine, laptop, etc. I'm switching them out and moving them around all the time - this will make it a lot easier. Not to mention, I can move the table around and the electrical outlet will move with me.

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How To Update Your Outlets (Step By Step Pics) | Young House Love

How To Update Your Outlets (Step By Step Pics) | Young House Love

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DIY a Built-in Extension Outlet

I've received a couple of emails asking how we converted a wall outlet into an extension outlet for our TV room sofa table. This outlet, built into the face of the table, allows us to utilize the electrical outlet that is behind the couch - without having to move the couch out of the way. I managed to corral Tom long enough to have him show me what he did. I shouldn't have to mention this, but if you are not comfortable/knowledgeable about working around electricity and electrical outlets, do not attempt to install this yourself. Update: We recently upgraded to an outlet with built-in USB ports, and I asked Tom to switch to a grounded wire at that time. Instructions are the same - refer to additional step for attaching third (ground) wire below. For this reconstruction we used spare parts we had laying around, but I'll also intersperse the photos and instructions with what we did the first time. However, the steps are exactly the same. Parts you will need: Tools you will need: If you're installing this outlet onto the face of a board - like a table - the first thing you'll want to do is cut a hole in the table the same size as the electrical box. Tom used a rotary zip saw, but you could also use a jigsaw. When Tom installed the original outlets he used an airtight electrical box like this that had a frame around it. He was able to screw the frame directly to the underside of the table. An airtight box wasn't necessary but it was all the store had in stock. If your electrical box doesn't have a frame, you can install a piece of scrap wood to the underside of your surface, and attach the box to it. That's what I'm going to show you here. Fit the electrical box into place and hold the scrap wood against it, along the side of the box with the bracket. Drill pilot holes through your surface and into the scrap board. Make sure they are very, very close to the hole so that the face plate will cover them. Attach the screws so that your scrap board is held in place. Flip your table upside down and set it on a stable surface like a workbench, or even on the floor. It'll be much easier to attach the electrical box without having to crawl under the table. Using the holes in the electrical box bracket as a guide, attach screws on each side so that the box is securely fastened to your scrap board. As I mentioned, if you are using an airtight box with a frame, you'll just use short screws and attach the box directly to the underside of your surface. You don't want the screws poking through the topside, so measure carefully. I prefer the look of the airtight box but you have to work with what you can find. And from the top it won't look any different. Once your box is mounted to the board, you can work on attaching the wiring. Take your extension cord and cut off the outlet connector (the socket end). Our outlet is only used to plug in lamps, phones, computers, etc., so we bought a light-duty 2-pronged cord, but if you are using your outlet for more heavy-duty loads or in wet areas, you'll want a 3-pronged grounded cord. Take the cut end of the cord and split the two wire bundles apart. Using your sidecutters, a knife or wire strippers, carefully cut through the plastic sheath without cutting the wire inside and pull it off. You'll want to have about an inch of exposed wire. Do this on both wires. Twist each bundle of exposed wire tightly so that it isn't fanned out. If you are using a grounded wire, there will only be one sheath. When you strip it off you'll find three more wire sheaths, white, black, and green. The green one is the grounded wire. You'll need to strip off an inch of each coloured sheath to expose the copper wire. It should look something like this: source Feed the two wires through one of the openings in the underside of the electrical box. The tabs are made of plastic, so you should be able to push them in slightly, enough to get the wire through. Pull the wire up through the front of the box so that you have enough to work with. Your electrical outlet will come with 4 brass screws, 2 on each side. Tighten one on each side just to get it out of your way. Take one of your wires and twist the exposed end around one of the (untightened) screws on the outlet. Make sure that you twist the wire in the same direction as you will be tightening the screw (usually clockwise). Tighten the screw down. Repeat this on the other side of the outlet. If you are using an extension cord with a third ground wire, attach that wire (which you previously stripped as above) to either the green screw in the bottom of the electrical box, or to the green screw that's right on the electrical outlet. Either place works, as once the electrical outlet is attached to the box the circuit will be complete. Once your wires are attached, screw the outlet into the box through the holes at either end (the correct screws should be provided with your outlet). Attach your faceplate and you're done. When we put the outlets in the sofa table we used a larger rectangular outlet versus the common outlet with rounded corners. These outlets require a slightly larger faceplate - which is beneficial to you if you're using the scrap board mounting method and need to cover up your screw holes. Once Tom showed me how to install this outlet, I couldn't believe how easy it was. I'm terrified of electricity, but I think even I could do this without being afraid of zapping myself. I'm thinking of attaching one to the side of my craft table so that I don't have to crawl under the table all the time to plug things in - the sewing machine, the Silhouette cutting machine, laptop, etc. I'm switching them out and moving them around all the time - this will make it a lot easier. Not to mention, I can move the table around and the electrical outlet will move with me.

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EZ Air Bed Self-Inflating Queen Size Air Mattress with Built-in Frame, Pump and Wheeled Case

Handy Air Mattress with Built-in Frame After a long day of travelling, no one wants to spend a long time inflating their portable mattress. When it's time to set up your Simpli Comfy EZ BED, simply unzip it from the convenient and compact wheeled storage case, roll it out, plug it into any standard outlet and turn the dial on the built-in pump to “inflate”. The bed will automatically inflate in less than 3 minutes so you will be counting sheep in no time. Convenient Air Bed with Built-in Pump Yo

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Easy Electrical Outlet Cover Tip to Fix Mismatched Electrical Outlets - Dream Design DIY

I found an amazing product that I am super excited to share with you that will fix mismatched electrical outlets and electrical outlet covers. When we moved into our 1970s home there were several major and minor things that needed updating. One of the minor updates was the electrical outlets and covers. I prefer ... Read More about Easy Electrical Outlet Cover Tip to Fix Mismatched Electrical Outlets

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Butterfly / Switch Cover / Wall art / toggle switchplate / Outlet / Butterfly decor / Sculpture / Wall Plate cover

Butterfly Single Toggle Switch Plate(Also Available in Double Toggle Switch Plate-Sold Separately. Original butterfly light switch wall plate designed and created exclusively by Dennis Short and you will not find this switch plate anyplace else. Cast in a durable polyurethane plastic, it fits any single toggle switch and comes in a sleek modern white color that will go with nearly any room design. This particular design I made into a butterfly and it really stands out on a wall.To me when I see this in white it reminds me of a marble sculpture. I'll be adding colored ones in the future as choices as well. As mentioned, you won't find this anyplace else and imagine how this will really set your room apart from any others. I hand cast and finish these myself and strive for top quality. The plate screws will not be included, but you can easily find these at any local hardware store such as Lowe's. Be sure to check back in the future for more exclusive plate designs. This is my own, original design and is registered copyrighted. I describe all my auctions as best I can and I'm selling this as-is and what you see is what you get and I always do my best to describe very well my auctions and have good photos. So if you have any questions whatsoever, feel free to ask before auction end. Be sure to check back for many more original wall outlet plates. Also be sure to check out my other auctions. Buying more than one? Only pay the shipping on one then the rest are shipped together, free of charge, so bulk up and decorate more than one room or your entire home! I only accept purchases from the lower 48 states. Thank-you, and good luck with your bidding.:)

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