Housewives protesting on O’Connell Bridge (1963)  Housewives crossing O'Connell Bridge in a march protesting the introduction of Turnover Tax, a new sales tax.  © Irish Photographic Archive

Housewives march in protest at the introduction of Turnover Tax, a new sales tax. The garda wearing white gloves in a raised booth to the centre right of the picture directed traffic on O’Connell Bridge.

Dublin 1922 Armed anti-Treaty members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in Grafton Street, Dublin during the Irish Civil War. (Photo by Walshe/Getty Images) Notice how the shop fronts are down, was it Sunday?

Dublin 1922 Armed anti-Treaty members of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in Grafton Street, Dublin during the Irish Civil War. (Photo by Walshe/Getty Images) Notice how the shop fronts are down, was it Sunday?

Skeleton of the Metropole Hotel  All that remained of the Metropole Hotel, beside the GPO on Sackville Street (now O'Connell Street), after the Easter Rising, 1916. This site is now occupied by Penney's Department Store.  Dublin, Ireland  Date: Circa May 1916

All that remained of the Metropole Hotel, beside the GPO on Sackville Street (now O'Connell Street), after the Easter Rising, This site is now occupied by Penney's Department Store. Date: Circa May 1916 NLI Ref.

June 1922: Crowds gather outside the Irish Law Courts in Dublin where the anti-treaty section of the IRA have established their headquarters during the Irish Civil War. (Photo by Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

June Crowds gather outside the Irish Law Courts in Dublin where the anti-treaty section of the IRA have established their headquarters during the Irish Civil War. (Photo by Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

The Carlton, O'Connell Street. The cinema opened on 16 April 1938 with the first film, The Awful Truth. It was built on the site of the first Carlton Cinema (1915–1936). There was seating for 1,500 in the stalls and 500 in the circle. In 1956, the cinema held the European premiere of Rock Around the Clock and it played to packed houses for three weeks. Currently vacant.

The Carlton, O'Connell Street. The cinema opened on 16 April 1938 with the first film, The Awful Truth. It was built on the site of the first Carlton Cinema (1915–1936). There was seating for 1,500 in the stalls and 500 in the circle. In 1956, the cinema held the European premiere of Rock Around the Clock and it played to packed houses for three weeks. Currently vacant.

Georges St . Featuring PIMS Department store c:1965

The origins of bus services in Dublin go back to the first horse tram, the Terenure route, in A network of tram routes developed quickly, and the network was electrified between 1898 and

9th March 1966: During the 50th anniversary year of the 1916 Easter Rising the Irish Army remove the remainder of Nelson's Pillar in the centre of O'Connell Street, Dublin, after it was demolished by an explosion. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

March During the anniversary year of the 1916 Easter Rising the Irish Army remove the remainder of Nelson's Pillar in the centre of O'Connell Street, Dublin, after it was demolished by an explosion. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

Guinness Liffey barge passes O’Connell Bridge (c.1950)  A Guinness Liffey Barge en route back to the Brewery having passed under O'Connell Bridge.  © Guinness

Guinness Liffey barge passes O’Connell Bridge A Guinness Liffey Barge en route back to the Brewery having passed under O'Connell Bridge.

Once the oldest in Dublin, the statue of William III, by Grinling Gibbons, was unveiled on 1st July, 1701. By the time this photograph was taken, however, the statue had been repaired several times, the head, as well as several limbs, having been replaced at least once. The statue was finally destroyed by an explosion in 1929

Once the oldest in Dublin, the statue of William III, by Grinling Gibbons, was…

The stump of Nelson's Pillar after the IRA blew it up on Tuesday, 8 March 1966, fifty years after the Easter Rising began at its base. Remarkably - and luckily - the explosion caused very little collateral damage.

Remains of the Nelson's Pillar after it was bombed by Irish Republicans, Dublin, 1966

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