Dublin Bridges

Discover the fascinating stories and history behind Dublin's iconic bridges. From the famous Ha'Penny Bridge to the modern Samuel Beckett bridge, Find out more at http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/.
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James Joyce Bridge   One of the Liffey’s newer bridges, it connects Blackhall place (home of the law society of ireland) to usher’s island, the home that takes centre stage in James Joyce’s short story, The Dead.  http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/james-joyce-bridge  Image courtesy of Dublin City Council

James Joyce Bridge One of the Liffey’s newer bridges, it connects Blackhall place (home of the law society of ireland) to usher’s island, the home that takes centre stage in James Joyce’s short story, The Dead. http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/james-joyce-bridge Image courtesy of Dublin City Council

Sean Heuston Bridge   Previously King’s Bridge, the cast-iron construction dating from 1828, once led horse-drawn traffic to Kingsbridge station renamed Heuston in 1941.   http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/sean-heuston-bridge  Image courtesy of Dublin City Council  Copyright Donal Murphy Photography

Sean Heuston Bridge Previously King’s Bridge, the cast-iron construction dating from 1828, once led horse-drawn traffic to Kingsbridge station renamed Heuston in 1941. http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/sean-heuston-bridge Image courtesy of Dublin City Council Copyright Donal Murphy Photography

Samuel Beckett Bridge  The rotatable samuel Beckett Bridge is a gleaming bastion of modern architecture  and the perfect foyer to Dublin’s sparklingly  regenerated docklands including the  magnificent Bord Gáis energy theatre on  the south side and the dazzling convention  centre Dublin on the north.   http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/samuel-beckett-bridge  Image courtesy of Dublin City Council  Copyright Donal Murphy Photography

Samuel Beckett Bridge The rotatable samuel Beckett Bridge is a gleaming bastion of modern architecture and the perfect foyer to Dublin’s sparklingly regenerated docklands including the magnificent Bord Gáis energy theatre on the south side and the dazzling convention centre Dublin on the north. http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/samuel-beckett-bridge Image courtesy of Dublin City Council Copyright Donal Murphy Photography

Mellows Bridge  Mellows Bridge is the ‘old man of the river’, the longest surviving structure of all the Liffey bridges within the city. Resting squarely, Mellows strikes an elder statesman pose - a certain raised eyebrow of an arch to Anna Liffey’s lively, ever youthful grace.  http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/mellows-bridge

Mellows Bridge Mellows Bridge is the ‘old man of the river’, the longest surviving structure of all the Liffey bridges within the city. Resting squarely, Mellows strikes an elder statesman pose - a certain raised eyebrow of an arch to Anna Liffey’s lively, ever youthful grace. http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/mellows-bridge

Grattan Bridge  The first bridge here, Essex Bridge built in 1676 by developer Humphrey Jervis, was Dublin’s third bridge and its most easterly - joining the pleasing grandeur of Capel Street, resplendent with fashionable Dutch style mansions, to the rambling medieval streets and lanes of the city’s south side.   http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/grattan-bridge

Grattan Bridge The first bridge here, Essex Bridge built in 1676 by developer Humphrey Jervis, was Dublin’s third bridge and its most easterly - joining the pleasing grandeur of Capel Street, resplendent with fashionable Dutch style mansions, to the rambling medieval streets and lanes of the city’s south side. http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/grattan-bridge

The Ha'Penny Bridge  The first pedestrian bridge to cross the Liffey. World renowned as the Ha’penny Bridge, in reference to that toll, but officially the Liffey Bridge since 1922, it has variously been known as the Wellington, Metal, Triangle or Iron Bridge.  http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/hapenny-bridge  Image courtesy of Dublin City Council

The Ha'Penny Bridge The first pedestrian bridge to cross the Liffey. World renowned as the Ha’penny Bridge, in reference to that toll, but officially the Liffey Bridge since 1922, it has variously been known as the Wellington, Metal, Triangle or Iron Bridge. http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/hapenny-bridge Image courtesy of Dublin City Council

Rory O'More Bridge  The distinctively coloured, single span, cast iron Rory O’More Bridge was declared open to the public in 1861 following its inaugural crossing by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. It was the Liffey’s third cast iron bridge and the capital’s first new bridge since the King’s Bridge of 1828, also named for a visiting royal. It crosses the river from from Ellis Street and the north quays to Watling Street on the south side.  Image courtesy of Dublin City Council

Rory O'More Bridge The distinctively coloured, single span, cast iron Rory O’More Bridge was declared open to the public in 1861 following its inaugural crossing by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. It was the Liffey’s third cast iron bridge and the capital’s first new bridge since the King’s Bridge of 1828, also named for a visiting royal. It crosses the river from from Ellis Street and the north quays to Watling Street on the south side. Image courtesy of Dublin City Council

Father Matthews Bridge   The only bridge to span the Liffey until 1674, it is close to what was the river’s first crossing point – a construction of interlaced hurdles that gave Dublin its name. Baile Átha Cliath means Town of the Hurdled Ford in irish.  http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/father-mathew-bridge  Image courtesy of Dublin City Council

Father Matthews Bridge The only bridge to span the Liffey until 1674, it is close to what was the river’s first crossing point – a construction of interlaced hurdles that gave Dublin its name. Baile Átha Cliath means Town of the Hurdled Ford in irish. http://www.bridgesofdublin.ie/bridges/father-mathew-bridge Image courtesy of Dublin City Council

O'Connell Bridge   O’Connell Bridge, once Carlisle Bridge,  was built in 1791 and is named after The Liberator Daniel o’connell who secured Catholic emancipation in 1829. You’ll see the man himself watching over proceedings from O’Connell street.   Image courtesy of Dublin City Council

O'Connell Bridge O’Connell Bridge, once Carlisle Bridge, was built in 1791 and is named after The Liberator Daniel o’connell who secured Catholic emancipation in 1829. You’ll see the man himself watching over proceedings from O’Connell street. Image courtesy of Dublin City Council


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